The Perfect Drinking Chocolate

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Drinking chocolate mixes by Acalli Chocolate gifted to me in 2015

About a year ago, I developed a bit of an obsession with drinking chocolate. While I am partial to Philadelphia’s Chocolate Alchemist’s inspired creations, they are made on-premises from the bean, which means you can’t recreate them at home. Thankfully, many craft chocolate companies now offer delicious, quality mixes (with cacao listed as a first ingredient, not sugar) to help us get through winter.

But first, let’s define what makes a good drinking chocolate. I personally like mine thick and dark, rich but not heavy, so I usually find hot cocoa to lack body and most drinks made from melted bars too thick or sweet. With that settled, I started experimenting with a few mixes, adapting milk and water volumes and ratios, until I obtained a drink with a taste and texture that I liked.

The three pouches above, gifted to me by Acalli Chocolate, were some of the most flavorful mixes I tried. To prepare the mixes, I drew inspiration from the “hot chocolate shot” prepared by Ritual Chocolate in Utah. I halved the amount of water recommended on the package, and dissolved 2 tablespoons mix (which is equivalent to 1/2 package) in 2 tablespoons of milk and 2-3 tablespoons of hot water. I loved the thicker texture and strong taste of the resulting drink. My favorite mix was the 1579 because of the balance of spice/chocolate. Original was next. Spicy was for my husband, as I cannot handle hot foods too well.

You can order these pouches online on Acalli Chocolate’s website. Another mix I really like is Undone Chocolate’s, which is made from Ecuadorian cacao. It is sold in powder form, so it is mixes really well with hot water or milk. Too bad my jar’s empty.

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Dick Taylor drinking chocolate sampled at Philter Coffee (Kennett Square, Pennsylvania)

Looking for more drinking chocolate inspiration? Read John Nanci’s comprehensive post on Chocolate Alchemy’s blog. Here is how a few of my Instagram followers prepare their drink.

I make Frankencocoa! We mix a bunch together.

Jess

2 tablespoons of unsweetened cocoa powder, 2 tablespoons of sugar and 1/2 cup of milk (the 2% works); mix very well, add spices (cayenne pepper, cinnamon, ginger, whatever you like) and bring to a boil so it really thickens.

The sugar and cocoa mix should be first heated up with 1/4 cup of the milk and whisked VERY well so there’s no cocoa lumps; then, once smooth, add the second 1/4 cup of milk (whole is even better, of could) and gently bring to 2 or 3 boils; that’s how it gets thick 🙂

Stéphanie

I like Taza Chocolate Mexican Chocolate Cinnamon disc mixed with blue corn masa or atole and piloncillo. I make mine with almond milk. I pretty much make most of my drinking chocolate with almond milk or water.

Sophia, Projet Chocolat

Now tell me: how do you prepare your drinking chocolate?

What is Bean-to-Bar Chocolate? (2/2)

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Back in December 2015, the concept of bean-to-bar chocolate was put on the spotlight after Scott, a Dallas-based blogger, published of four-part exposé demonstrating that the Mast Brothers company had not always been a bean-to-bar chocolate-maker. To meet early demand, Scott explains, the company used premade chocolate known as “couverture chocolate” instead of making it from the actual beans. While there is nothing wrong with using industrial chocolate in confections, the Mast Brothers had claimed to be bean-to-bar maker from their very early days. The chocolate scandal, which was relayed on national media, triggered a series of reactions that made one thing clear: there is a lot of confusion around what being a bean-to-bar chocolate-maker actually means.

If you are not clear on the concept yourself, take a moment to read the post I wrote to define the concept of bean-to-bar chocolate. However, the real challenge does not lay as much in explaining the concept as in determining why it matters in the first place. In this post, I’ll explain why the concept came to matter to me as a consumer.

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This chocolate bar by Cacao Atlanta has clear dark cherry notes

Before I started my 37 Chocolates challenge last year, the only chocolate I ever had came straight from the grocery store. For the past several years, I had resorted to chocolate to help me cope with stress at my deadline-driven job. I would buy 12-packs  of Theo Chocolate bars on Amazon (dark chocolate with cherries and almonds was a favorite), Endangered Species from the grocery store (I had a soft spot for the blueberry inclusion variety) or the 71% dark chocolate by Valrhona that I would stock up on at Trader Joe’s (I still really enjoy this bar). I would not spend more than $3.50 on a bar because I could not justify spending so much money on chocolate I would eat for stress relief purposes and, if I am really honest, mindlessly. In addition, I had already been disappointed by $8 bars marketed as “bean-to-bar” chocolate, which had then made one thing very clear: the term bean-to-bar is not a guarantee of quality. At that time, I made the decision of sticking with mass-produced but reliable and inexpensive bars than taking the risk of getting disappointed again.

Now, to be fair, all of the chocolate I ate at that point was technically bean-to-bar. However, I had noticed that the phrase typically found its way on the wrappers of handcrafted, smaller batch chocolate that you find in gourmet stores and independant coffee shops. As a consumer, I typically interpret that phrase as a justification of a higher price tag, since it’s a lot more work to make chocolate from scratch (i.e. from the beans) than it is to melt and remold industrial chocolate.

Time went by, I left the stressful job and started growing bored with my chocolate selection. While it felt safe to have a list of go-to brands and bars, that first bite of Twenty-Four Blackbirds Madagascar chocolate made me wonder what awaited me outside of my chocolate comfort zone. I had noticed the explosion of American-made, small batch chocolate and, surely, I thought, some of these bars had to be good. Plus, there seemed to be something about the whole “single origin” chocolate, even though I knew nothing at the time about the difference between Guatemalan or Peruvian cacao. Although I felt guilty at the idea of spending the equivalent of one hour of minimum wage into a 3-oz piece of indulgence, I grew increasingly curious and related the likely prospect of eating disappointing bars as the inevitable bad dates leading me to “the one.” So I took a leap, opened my mind (and yes, my wallet), and never looked back.

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Nightswimming, a beloved dark milk chocolate by Map Chocolate

Today, I mostly eat bean-to-bar, small batch chocolate and, while I still enjoy the occasional bar of Valrhona, here’s why there’s no going back.

First, I really appreciate knowing where my food comes from. Most small batch makers will disclose the country of origin of the cacao, some going as far as mentioning the name of the region or the actual estate where the cacao is from. Remember that 40% of the world’s cacao comes from West Africa, where the practice of child slavery is unfortunately still common on some plantations. When you buy industrially made chocolate, the odds are that the cacao used in the blend comes from West Africa.

Next, I learned to appreciate the concept of single origin chocolate, which is not commonly found in grocery stores. While my chocolate-making friend Robert Campbell swears by cacao blends, some single origin chocolates have completely blown me away. For instance, I love the light citrus notes of Madagascar chocolate, have fallen hard for the strong caramel notes of the Castronovo Sierra Nevada bar, and will never forget the distinct cherry notes of this Patanemo bar by Cacao Atlanta.

Finally, I discovered that some makers truly master the craft of making chocolate, going through every single step of the process, from the sourcing of the beans to the molding of the bars, with intention and care. These women and men know how to coax the flavors of each cacao, so the flavors will shine when hitting the tongue. Sometimes, the skilled maker is also an artist  who will infuse the bars with her or his vision of the world. In the right hands, the craft of making chocolate is elevated to the rank of art. Some bars will thus bring us to our knees and make our heart beat faster. And, sometimes, the chocolate will find such an echo in our soul that we may shed a tear. This is what Map Chocolate does to me. That is what an artfully crafted piece of chocolate can do to you. $8 for a piece of art? That’s what I call a steal.

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